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Regular Board Meeting
San Diego County Office of Education
April 12, 2017 6:00PM
Ernest J. Dronenberg, Jr. Board Room (Joe Rindone Regional Technology Center), 6401 Linda Vista Road, San Diego, CA 92111

1. OPENING PROVISIONS
1.1. Call to Order and Roll Call
1.2. Pledge of Allegiance to the Flag
1.3. Introduction of Student Representative on County Board of Education
1.3.1. Momentum Learning Student Representative for the April 12, 2017, Board Meeting
Quick Summary / Abstract:
The Momentum Learning Student Representative for the April 12, 2017, meeting is Jacqueline Hassel Romero from 37ECB. Site Administrator Tracy Thompson will introduce Jacqueline to the Board.  Board Member Mark Powell will present an award on behalf of the Board.




1.4. Approval of Agenda
1.5. Public Comment - Agenda and Non-Agenda Items
2. APPROVAL OF CONSENT ITEMS
2.1. Approval: Minutes of Special Meeting on March 8, 2017
Attachments:
Special Meeting Minutes - Mar 8, 2017
2.2. Approval: Minutes of Regular Meeting on March 8, 2017
Attachments:
Regular Board Meeting Minutes - March 8, 2017
2.3. Approval: Real Property Lease Agreements
Quick Summary / Abstract:
The County Board of Education is being asked to approve the real property lease agreements listed on Schedule “A” attached.
Rationale:
Section 1042(c) of the Education Code allows the County Board of Education to acquire, lease, or lease-purchase real property for the purpose of housing the offices and services of the County Superintendent of Schools.
 
Financial Impact:
Monthly lease costs are indicated on Schedule “A.”
Recommended Motion:
Approve the lease agreements listed on Schedule “A.”
Attachments:
Schedule A
2.4. Approval: Budget Adjustments
Speaker:
Lora Duzyk, Assistant Superintendent
Quick Summary / Abstract:
The County Board of Education is asked to approve revisions to the budget in accordance with the recommendation listed on the attached budget transfer sheet.



Rationale:
Board Policy No. 3102 authorizes the County Superintendent of Schools to approve budget revisions that do not result in an overall increase in the specific fund income requirement or the total expenditures for that fund and do not authorize new personnel positions.  The County Board of Education must authorize overall increases in total expenditures and new personnel positions.  
 
Financial Impact:
Budget revisions as listed. 
Recommended Motion:
That the Board of Education authorize adjustments of the budget in accordance with the recommendation listed on the attached Budget Transfer sheet.
Attachments:
Budget Transfer Sheet
2.5. Approval: Accept Grant Funds from Riverside County Superintendent of Schools on behalf of the California Collaborative for Educational Excellence for Regional Lead Service
Quick Summary / Abstract:
Approval of the County Board of Education is requested to accept grant funds from the Riverside County Superintendent of Schools on behalf of the California Collaborative for Educational Excellence Regional Lead Service.






Rationale:

The purpose of the California Collaborative for Educational Excellence (CCEE) is to advise and assist county offices of education, school districts, and charter schools in achieving the goals set forth in a Local Control Accountability Plan (LCAP).  CCEE will collaborate with 11 regional transformation teams based upon the California County Superintendents Educational Services Association (CCSESA) regions. Each regional lead will serve as a partner to CCEE in carrying out the Local Control Funding Formula (LCFF) Professional Development Training Implementation Plan, Component II.   

San Diego County Office of Education (SDCOE) will serve as a regional lead to coordinate grant implementation activities and provide CCEE a Regional Training Plan describing how trainings on the LCFF Evaluation Rubrics are available to all school districts and charter schools within CCSESA Region Nine.



 
Financial Impact:

SDCOE will receive $70,000 to serve as regional lead.


Recommended Motion:
Accept grant funds.
Attachments:
CCEEGrantBudgetSheet
2.6. Acceptance: Educator Effectiveness Expenditure Plan
Quick Summary / Abstract:
The County Board of Education is requested to accept the San Diego County Office of Education expenditure plan for the apportionment funds provided by the California Department of Education pursuant to Section 58 of Assembly Bill (AB) 104 (Chapter 13, Statutes of 2015) as amended by Section 8 of Senate Bill (SB) 103 (Chapter 324, Statutes of 2015) in support of Educator Effectiveness.


Rationale:

The California Department of Education (CDE) provided the San Diego County Office of Education (SDCOE) apportionment funds in the amount of $501,556 to support educator and administrator effectiveness.  This funding was based on the number of full-time equivalent certificated staff.

The SDCOE Educator Effectiveness expenditure plan will focus on supporting teachers and administrators in improving the preparation and instructional program offered students in SDCOE schools and programs.  A presentation on the Educator Effectiveness expenditure plan was made to the board on February 8, 2017.



 
Financial Impact:
The CDE apportionment for SDCOE is $501,556 to support Educator Effectiveness.


Recommended Motion:
Accept the Educator Effectiveness Expenditure Plan as presented.

Attachments:
Operational Budget Plan
2.7. Adoption: 2017-18 School Calendars for Davila Day School, Early Education Programs and Services/Hope Infant Family Support, Friendship School, North Coastal Consortium, and North County Academy
Quick Summary / Abstract:
The County Board of Education is requested to adopt school calendars for the 2017-18 school year for Davila Day School, Early Education Programs and Services/HOPE Infant Family Support, Friendship School, North Coastal Consortium, and North County Academy.

Rationale:

SDCOE Board Policy No. 6111 requires that no later than May of the preceding school year the County Superintendent of Schools present to the County Board of Education for adoption recommended school calendars for schools and programs operated by the County Superintendent of Schools.

The attached recommended school calendars were created for maximum benefit to students; and include the designation of the beginning and ending of the school year, legal holidays, school recess periods, and the instructional days for students.




 
Financial Impact:
No fiscal impact.
Recommended Motion:

Adopt the recommended 2017-18 school calendars for SDCOE special education programs.

Attachments:
2017-18 Davila Day School Calendar-REVISED
2017-18 Friendship School Calendar-REVISED
2017-18 HOPE/Infant School Calendar
2017-18 NCCSE School Calendar
2017-18 NCCSE/NCA School Calendar
2.8. Adoption: Resolution for National School Nurse Day
Quick Summary / Abstract:

Approval of the County Board of Education is requested to adopt a resolution for National School Nurse Day on May 10, 2017.



Rationale:

National School Nurse Day has been celebrated for 39 years and was established in 1977 to recognize the vital role that school nurses play in improving the health and well-being of our nation’s children.  This year’s celebration is on Wednesday, May 10, 2017, during National Nurse Week, May 8 - 12, 2017.

During the past two decades, school nurse duties and responsibilities have grown exponentially.  The mainstreaming of students with severe physical or chronic medical conditions into public schools has impacted the school nurse’s role and focus.  Among their many responsibilities, school nurses promote health and safety, intervene with actual and potential health problems, provide case management services, and actively collaborate with others to build student/family capacity for self-management, self-advocacy, and learning.  They often provide these services to increasingly greater numbers of students and frequently more than one school building.  School nurses may provide the first and only consistent source of health services for millions of uninsured and underinsured children.

According to CBEDS data, there are 2,391 public school nurses in California, plus many private and charter school nurses serving more than six million students across various settings.  San Diego County has 258 public school nurses.  School nurses continue to prove their value to the educational process by keeping children healthy, in school, and ready to learn.

This resolution will honor the dedicated and talented nurses in our county and nation.
 
Financial Impact:
No fiscal impact.
Recommended Motion:
Adopt the resolution to endorse May 10, 2017, as School Nurse Day.
Attachments:
2017 National School Nurse Day Resolution
2.9. Adoption: Resolution Endorsing May 2017 as National Foster Care Month
Quick Summary / Abstract:

Approval of the County Board of Education is requested to adopt a resolution in support of National Foster Care Month in May 2017.


Rationale:

National Foster Care Month originated in 1988 when the National Foster Parent Association persuaded legislators to introduce a resolution to proclaim May as National Foster Care Month. President George H.W. Bush issued an annual proclamation during each year of his presidency, providing an impetus for state, county and city proclamations. The main focus of these early efforts was appreciation and recognition of the tremendous contributions of foster parents across the nation.

National Foster Care Month heightens visibility for the issue and provides a strong outreach and recruitment platform for individuals and organizations working to support children and families throughout the year. National Foster Care Month Core Messages are:

THE MAGNITUDE: Currently, nearly half a million children in the United States are in foster care because their own families are in crisis and unable to provide for their essential well-being. Reports of abuse and neglect have already increased in some areas of the country due to the difficult economic times. In addition, there are an estimated 12 million alumni of foster care in the U.S. representing all walks of life.

THE NEED: No matter their age, all youth in foster care need a meaningful connection to a caring adult who becomes a supportive and lasting presence in their lives. Without families or stable relationships, too many of these formerly neglected and/or abused children and teens will end up facing life’s challenges all alone.

THE FACES OF FOSTER CARE: Child welfare issues arise in families of every race, ethnicity, culture, and age group. Even though research shows that there is no difference in the incidence of abuse and neglect according to racial group, children of color comprise a disproportionate percentage of youth in foster care.

THE CONSEQUENCES: Research shows that young people who age out of foster care are far more likely than their peers in the general population to endure homelessness, poverty, compromised health, unemployment, incarceration and other adversities. Children in foster care are the lowest achieving sub group of students in California.

THE PRIORITY: Older youth are in most urgent need of attention. Nearly half of the young people in foster care are over the age of 10. Each year, 26,000 young people in the United States age out of foster care, most without the appropriate resources, family connections, skills or options they will need to live healthy adult lives. California is the first state to include foster youth as a separate subgroup under API under the Local Control Funding Formula and the Local Control Accountability Plan.

This resolution will honor the nearly 4,000 children and youth in foster care in San Diego County, and the work of Student Support Services Unit, which provides educational and supportive services to students in foster care through the Foster Youth and Homeless Services Program.

 
Financial Impact:
No fiscal impact.
Recommended Motion:
Adopt the resolution to endorse May 2017 as National Foster Care Month.
Attachments:
2017 National Foster Care Month Resolution
2.10. Adoption: Resolution Endorsing May 2017 as National Mental Health Awareness Month
Quick Summary / Abstract:

Approval of the County Board of Education is requested to adopt a resolution in support of National Mental Health Awareness month in May 2017.


Rationale:

In 2013, President Barack Obama issued a proclamation declaring May National Mental Health Awareness month.  For more than 60 years, Mental Health America and affiliates across the country have led the observance of May as Mental Health Month by reaching millions of people through the media, local events and screenings.

Tens of millions of Americans are living with the burden of a mental health problem. They shoulder conditions like depression and anxiety, post-traumatic stress and bipolar disorder -- debilitating illnesses that can strain every part of a person's life.  Even though help is out there, less than half of children and adults with diagnosable mental health problems receive treatment. During National Mental Health Awareness Month, we shine a light on these issues, stand with children, men and women in need, and redouble our efforts to address mental health problems in America. 

People who have been diagnosed with a mental illness are students, teachers, doctors, politicians, lawyers, artists, business owners and scientists, among many other occupations that contribute to society in major ways. They are our colleagues, family, friends and neighbors.

Mental health is as important to our well-being as physical health. In fact, the two are closely related. As with physical health, we can prevent unnecessary suffering if we can identify mental health challenges early or even prevent them by taking good care of each other and ourselves.

As a Nation, it is up to all of us to know the signs of mental health issues and lend a hand to those who are struggling. Shame and stigma too often leave people feeling like there is no place to turn. We need to make sure they know that asking for help is not a sign of weakness -- it is a sign of strength.

This resolution will honor the tens of millions of Americans who are living with the burden of a mental health problem, and the work of the Student Services and Programs Division, Student Support Services Unit.


 
Financial Impact:
No fiscal impact.
Recommended Motion:
Adopt the resolution to endorse May 2017 as National Mental Health Awareness Month.
Attachments:
2017 National Mental Health Care Month Res
2.11. Adoption: Resolution Honoring the Ninth District PTA
Quick Summary / Abstract:
In honor of the Ninth District PTA Centennial, the San Diego County Board of Education is adopting a resolution in recognition of their services to our schools and communities.



Attachments:
2017 Ninth District PTA Resolution
3. ASSOCIATIONS COMMENTARY
4. RECOGNITIONS AND PRESENTATIONS
4.1. Recognition: Winning Student of the 2017 San Diego Union-Tribune Countywide Spelling Bee
Speaker:
Nicole Shina
Quick Summary / Abstract:
Yash Hande, student at Pacific Trails Middle in the San Dieguito High School District, competed with one-hundred 6th, 7th and 8th graders in the Union-Tribune San Diego Countywide Spelling Bee on March 23, 2017, at the San Diego Hall of Champions. This event co-sponsored by the San Diego County Office of Education is the official stepping-stone to the Scripps National Spelling Bee held annually in National Harbor, Maryland.






4.2. Recognition: San Diego County Office of Education Classified Employee of the Year 2017
Speaker:
Chris Reising
Quick Summary / Abstract:
The County Board of Education annually presents an award to the San Diego County Office of Education’s Classified Employee of the Year.
Rationale:
This is the 30th year of the San Diego County Office of Education Classified Employee of the Year program, instituted to recognize the exemplary contribution of support staff members.  A committee of classified employees representing each division reviews all nominations and selects the winner.  Past County Office Classified Employee of the Year winners include Mike Reese (2011), Shiela Musser (2012), Alfred “Ernie” Ludwig (2013), Mandy Lievanos (2014), Aida Hairston (2015), and Gabriela “Gaby” Beas (2016).

This year the committee selected Christine “Christy” Chapman. Chapman has been the audiological technician for the East County Special Education Local Plan Area (SELPA) for 13 years and has worked for SDCOE for more than 15 years. She works with about 200 students from birth to age 22 in 11 districts as well as five itinerant teachers and three audiologists who work for the SELPA. Chapman said she first became interested in working with people with hearing loss as a teenager. While on a youth group retreat, she met a girl who was deaf and was frustrated that she couldn't communicate with her. She vowed then to learn sign language. Chapman also volunteers for community events to help engage students with hearing loss. 

A certificate of recognition will be presented to Christine at the board meeting and her name was submitted as a nominee for the Countywide Classified Employee of the Year.

Other nominees for the San Diego County Office of Education Classified Employee of the Year 2017 included: Vanessa Aquino, Betsy De La Rosa, Christina Fekas-Gorman, Joe Hernandez, Alicia Moyer, Oscar Ramirez, Michele Roman, and Kymm Wolfe.









 
Financial Impact:

No fiscal impact.

4.3. Presentation: California's New Accountability System
Speaker:
Steven Green
Quick Summary / Abstract:
California has a new accountability and continuous improvement system that determines local educational agencies' (LEA) and schools' progress towards meeting the status and growth requirements established for the eight state priorities.




Rationale:

In 2013, the Local Control Funding Formula (LCFF) was passed requiring a new accountability system that is based on multiple measures. These measures are used to determine LEA and school progress toward meeting the needs of their students. The measures are based on the eight state priorities and the factors that contribute to a quality education, including high school graduation rates, college/career readiness, student test scores, English learner (EL) progress, suspension rates, and parent engagement.

This presentation will provide an overview of California’s new accountability and continuous improvement system that is accessible through the California School Dashboard reporting website that was launched on March 15, 2017, and is aligned to the LCFF state and local Indicators.




 
Financial Impact:
None.

Recommended Motion:
None.
Attachments:
Calif New Accountability System
5. ACTION ITEMS
5.1. Approval: Resolution Taking Action on Appeal of District Denial Petition to Establish Scholarship Prep Charter School
Speaker:
Lora Duzyk, Assistant Superintendent
Quick Summary / Abstract:
An appeal of the denial of a charter school petition to establish Scholarship Prep Charter School is presented to the County Board of Education for consideration.
Rationale:

The Scholarship Prep Charter School (“SPCS”) petition was filed on appeal to the County Board of Education by Ms. Gloria Romero and Mr. Jason Watts, lead petitioners, after it was denied by the Oceanside Unified School District Governing Board on November 15, 2016.  The charter petition, with supporting documents, was determined to be complete on February 15, 2017.  The County Board of Education (“Board”) held a public hearing to consider the level of support for the petition pursuant to California Education Code section 47605 (b), at a regular Board meeting on March 8, 2017.  At this hearing, staff from Oceanside Unified School District (“OUSD”) spoke in opposition to the approval. Representatives of SPCS, parents and students spoke in support of SPCS.

Section 11967, California Code of Regulations, Title 5, establishes a 60-day time period during which a county board may act to approve or deny a petition previously denied by a school district.  If the county board does not grant or deny the petition within that timeframe, the charter school may submit the petition to the State Board of Education.  Education Code section 47605(j) provides that if the county board acts to deny the petition, the petitioner may elect to file the petition with the State Board of Education.

The Education Code requires a county board of education to grant a charter school on appeal if it is satisfied that granting the charter is consistent with sound educational practice.  The county board shall not deny a petition for the establishment of a charter school unless it makes written findings, specific to the particular petition, setting forth specific facts to support one or more of the findings in Education Code section 47605(b). 

A committee was formed to review the SPCS charter petition (“SPCS Petition”) in accordance with Board Policy 0310, and Administrative Regulations 0310 and 0310.1, utilizing the criteria for charter approval set forth in Education Code section 47605.  The San Diego County Office of Education staff who served on the committee were: Jean Madden-Cazares, Brian Butler, Chelsea Cochrane, Pauline Crooks, Jennifer Currie, Steve Green, Matt Hays, Olympia Kyriakidis, Audrey Mendivil, Paige Metz, Tony Mora, Bernadette Nguyen, Nancy Sedgwick, and Terry Walter of Learning and Leadership Services; Brent Watson, Kristin Armatis and Natalie Schuff of Business Advisory Services; Chris Reising of Human Resources; Diane Crosier from Risk Management;  Don Buchheit and Carolyn Nunes representing Student Support Services and Special Education; and Bill Dos Santos of Educational Facilities Solutions.  Ms. Maribel Medina, Esq. provided legal counsel, (collectively, the “Review Team”).

The Review Team provides the Board with an assessment of the sufficiency of the SPCS Petition with respect to all criteria for approval.  The Review Team recommends that the County Board approve the SPCS petition. There are however certain deficiencies in the SPCS petition.  The Review Team recommends that the Board’s approval include a directive to have the County Superintendent, or his designee, negotiate and enter into a Memorandum of Understanding (“MOU”) with SPCS.  The MOU shall set forth the duties and responsibilities of SDCOE and SPCS with respect to numerous operational and financial matters, but shall also require the following from SPCS:

1. Goals and Priorities:

  •  Clarify and add appropriate measurable objectives for all areas.

2. English Learners and English Language Development (ELD):

  • Show alignment to current ELD standards and framework.
  • Provide clearly articulated plan for Designated ELD (in addition to Integrated ELD noted in petition), as required, including alignment to CA ELD standards and ELA/ELD Framework.
  • Clarify how instructional materials to be used (see also ELA) have been vetted and align to CA content standards (as required).
  • Clarify and provide a cohesive, coherent plan for professional learning related to standards aligned ELD and specific needs of diverse ELs.

3. Standards-Aligned Instructional Materials:

 

  • Clarify identified instructional materials is alignment to current CA content standards.
  • Clarify and provide details on the process for selecting instructional materials- particularly those not on the CA approved list - ensuring they are standards aligned as required. 

4. Instructional Programs – Units of Study:

 

  • Clarify “Units of Study”: role, process for development, related budget, etc.
  • Clarify and provide a coherent and cohesive instructional design and delivery model for standards aligned instruction across the subjects.
  • Include sample schedules (daily/weekly) that provide an overview of how all subjects will be addressed at the elementary and middle levels.
  • Provide the missing “sample Scope and Sequence Plan for ELA/Literacy and Math

5. Overall School/Program Coherence and Professional Learning:

Clarify and refine to show program coherence and relevant professional learning:

  • Clarify how professional learning will be designed, organized, budgeted, prioritized, and provided to reflect student and educator needs, as well as the numerous initiatives and programs included in the petition.

6. Subject Areas

 All Subjects:

 

 

 All Subjects:

  • Clarify instructional delivery
  • providing sample scope/sequence,curriculum map, schedules
  • demonstrate integration of noted initiatives and programs

Specific subjects:

 

 

World Language

  • Show intention and design of the Mandarin language program at elementary and Middle School Levels.

     Health and Physical Education

  •  Include state required FITNESSGRAM in assessments.

Mathematics

  • Clarify 8th grade course(s), including placement and pathways that will articulate to HS

    English Language Arts:

  • Describe key components and implementation design for balanced reading program, noted in petition, and alignment to CA standards and framework.

 Science

  • Clarify all NGSS standards, practices are included.

A resolution approving the charter school petition is provided for the Board’s consideration. The resolution addresses the Review Team’s proposal for an MOU, including the provision that failure to negotiate an MOU by May 31, 2017, may serve as grounds for revocation.

The Review Team also recommends authorizing the Superintendent or his or her designee to make any non-substantive modifications to the proposed MOU as may be necessary or advisable, subject to agreement of the SPCS.




 
Financial Impact:

There are substantial costs to the County Office of Education for reviewing any charter school petition.  Those costs have not been calculated for this petition review nor do those costs constitute a condition for granting or denying a charter petition.

 BOARD OPTIONS AND CONSEQUENCES:

“Yes”- If the Board approves the petition, SDCOE becomes the chartering authority, and hence the supervisory agency over the charter school.

“No”- If the Board denies the petition, the Petitioners may appeal to the State Board of Education. (Education Code § 47605 (j)(1)).

“Fails to Act” – If the Board fails to act on the petition within 120 days, Petitioners may seek judicial review of the district’s denial of the petition. 


Recommended Motion:
Accept the committee’s recommendation to approve, with conditions to be included in an MOU, the appeal and adopt the “Resolution of the San Diego County Board of Education Approving the Charter School Petition to Establish Scholarship Prep Charter School” with the noted findings. 
Attachments:
2017 Resolution-Approve Scholarship Prep
5.2. Acceptance: Williams Uniform Complaint Policy Quarterly Report
Quick Summary / Abstract:

This consent item provides the County Superintendent of Schools and the Board of Education with summarized data related to Williams Uniform Complaints filed quarterly for Momentum Learning.  






Rationale:

Education Code 35186(d) requires: “A school district shall report summarized data on the nature and resolution of all complaints on a quarterly basis to the county superintendent of schools and the governing board of the school district. The summaries shall be publicly reported on a quarterly basis at a regularly scheduled meeting of the governing board of the school district.  The report shall include the number of complaints by general subject area with the number of resolved and unresolved complaints. The complaints and written responses shall be available as public records.”  Momentum Learning will submit quarterly reports to the County Superintendent of Schools and the Governing Board in July, October, January, and April.




 
Financial Impact:

No financial impact.



Recommended Motion:

Accept the quarterly report from January 1, 2017, through March 31, 2017, reflecting that San Diego County Office of Education Momentum Learning received zero complaints regarding instructional materials, facilities, teacher vacancy or misassignments. 


Attachments:
UCP Quarterly Report Jan-Mar 2017
5.3. Acceptance: Specified Board Bylaws for First Reading
Speaker:
Lora Duzyk, Assistant Superintendent
Quick Summary / Abstract:
The County Board of Education is asked to accept specified board bylaws for first reading. 

Rationale:
The Policy Committee submits the board bylaws listed in Attachment 1 for acceptance at first reading.  In accordance with established practice, if accepted, the proposed bylaws will be posted online for comments and/or recommendations for ten working days and will be resubmitted at a future board meeting for second reading and adoption.  

 
Recommended Motion:
Accept the Board Bylaws listed in Attachment 1 for first reading.
Attachments:
Attachment 1
BB 9005 Governance Standards
BB 9010 Public Statements
BB 9012 Board Member Electronic Communications
BB 9100 Organization
BB 9121 Board Officers
BB 9121.1 Vacancies Officers
BB 9122 Secretary to the Board
BB 9124 Attorney
BB 9125 Contracts for Special Services
BB 9130 Board Committees
BB 9140 Board Representatives
BB 9200 Limits of Board Member Authority
BB 9215 Educational Districts
BB 9222 Resignations
BB 9223 Board Vacancies
BB 9224 Oath or Affirmation
BB 9230 Orientation
BB 9240 Board Development
5.4. Approval: Annual Authorization to Lend Funds to School Districts
Speaker:
Lora Duzyk, Assistant Superintendent
Quick Summary / Abstract:
The San Diego County Board of Education is requested to authorize the superintendent to make temporary loans to school districts.

Rationale:
The County Superintendent of Schools, with the approval of the County Board of Education, is authorized to lend money to school districts temporarily to help them meet their obligations when their funds on hand become less than their requirements.
 
Financial Impact:
No fiscal impact.
Recommended Motion:
Authorize the superintendent to lend money to school districts within the County in accordance with Education Code Sections 42621-42622 and notify the board if any loans are authorized to school districts.
5.5. Approval: Distribution of Forest Reserve Funds
Speaker:
Lora Duzyk, Assistant Superintendent
Quick Summary / Abstract:
Approval is requested from the Board of Education for the distribution of the Forest Reserve Funds as indicated on the attachment in accordance with Education Code Section 2300.



Rationale:
Every year the State Controller’s Office distributes to counties their pro rata share of revenues from the United States Forest Reserve Fund, to be allocated to school districts with federal forest property within district boundaries.  The Forest Reserve revenue received this year is $300,951.25 plus interest earned $299.05, for a total distribution of $301,250.30.
 
Recommended Motion:
Approve the distribution of Forest Reserve Funds to entitled districts.
Attachments:
Allocation Forest Reserve 1617
Distribution Forest Reserve 1617
6. INFORMATION ITEMS - NO ACTION
6.1. California Education Code 1302 - $10,000 Rule (Classified Management)
Speaker:
Edward Velasquez
Quick Summary / Abstract:
The County Board of Education will be provided with information regarding an employee promotion that resulted in more than a $10,000 increase in annual salary.
Rationale:
William Dowler brought 19 years of human resource service to the position of Human Resources Senior Manager.  When hired, he was not given credit on the salary schedule for experience in like positions as were other managers.  This past experience brings valuable expertise and service to the department.  In the recent reorganization of the SDCOE Human Resources Department, Mr. Dowler was reallocated from a Classified Management Grade 47 step three to a Classified Management Grade 47 step 5.

California Education Code Section 1302:

(a) The county superintendent of schools shall not increase by ten thousand dollars ($10,000) or more the salary or bonus of any employee of the county office of education unless the matter is brought to the attention of the county board of education for its discussion at a regularly scheduled public meeting of the county board of education.




 
Financial Impact:

Mr. Dowler is moving from an annual salary of $123,165 to an annual salary of $135,793, resulting in a $12,628 annual salary increase. The salary for this position was already allocated in the 2016-17 budget.



6.2. California Education Code 1302 - $10,000 Rule (Classified)
Speaker:
Edward Velasquez
Quick Summary / Abstract:

The County Board of Education is provided with information regarding an employee promotion which results in more than a $10,000 increase in annual salary.

Rationale:
Natalie Azzam successfully competed and was selected for a promotion on April 4, 2017, from an Accounting Systems Analyst (Classified Support Grade 58, Step 3) to Accounting and Data Support Specialist (Classified Management Grade 38, Step 1).  Both positions reside in the Business Services Division.

California Education Code Section 1302:

(a) The county superintendent of schools shall not increase by ten thousand dollars ($10,000) or more the salary or bonus of any employee of the county office of education unless the matter is brought to the attention of the county board of education for its discussion at a regularly scheduled public meeting of the county board of education.

 
Financial Impact:
Ms. Azzam is moving from an annual salary of $66,814 to an annual salary of $89,448, resulting in a $22,634 annual salary increase.   The salary for this position was already allocated in the 2016-17 budget.


Recommended Motion:


6.3. Legislative Update
7. BOARD REPORTS
7.1. Communications from Board Members
8. FUTURE AGENDA ITEMS
9. NEXT MEETING DATES
9.1. Special Board Meeting - Budget Study Session, Tuesday, April 25, 2017, 10 a.m., Jack Port Board Room (Room 508)
9.2. Regular Board Meeting on Wednesday, April 26, 2017, 6 p.m., Joe Rindone Regional Technology Center
9.3. Regular Board Meeting on Wednesday, May 10, 2017, 6 p.m., Joe Rindone Regional Technology Center
10. ADJOURNMENT
Disability Information:
In accordance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, if accommodations are required, please call the Board Secretary 48 hours in advance at (858) 292-3515 and every effort will be made to accommodate your request. In compliance with Government Code section 54957.5, non-exempt writings that are distributed to a majority or all of the board in advance of a meeting, may be viewed at 6401 Linda Vista Road, Room 509, San Diego, California 92111; at our website at http://www.sdcoe.net/Board/Pages/default.aspx; or at the scheduled meeting. In addition, if you would like a copy of any record related to an item on the agenda, please contact Carmen P. Aguilar at (858) 292-3515.

Published: April 7, 2017, 3:46 PM

The resubmit was successful.